4/19/16 Show feat. Ksenia Nouril on art and science during the Cold War, plus the editors of Highwire Earth

Valdis Celms. View of Positron, 1977. Ink and collaged photograph mounted on fiberboard. Zimmerli Art Museum, Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union. © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / AKKA-LAA, Latvia. Photo Peter Jacobs
Featured Image: Valdis Celms. View of Positron, 1977. Ink and collaged photograph mounted on fiberboard. Zimmerli Art Museum, Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union. © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / AKKA-LAA, Latvia. Photo Peter Jacobs

Last Tuesday was a wonderful, packed show. First we spoke to Ksenia Nouril, doctoral candidate in art history at Rutgers, New Brunswick, C-MAP Fellow at the Museum Of Modern Art in New York City, and Dodge Fellow at the Zimmerli Art Museum, also at Rutgers University.

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Ksenia Nouril. Credit: Sohl Lee

Furthermore, Ksenia is the curator of an excellent exhibit at the Zimmerli Art Museum that explores this topic, entitled Dreamworlds and Catastrophes, that will be up until July 31st, 2016 (free entry, information for visitors).

Throughout the first hour of the show Ksenia spoke to us on the intersections of art and science in Cold War Era Soviet Russia.

We discussed specific pieces like the Positron (featured image), and The Cosmonaut’s Dream.

Sherstiuk 1991
Sergei Sherstiuk (Russian, 1951-1998), The Cosmonaut’s Dream1986. Oil on canvas. Collection Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union. Photo by Peter Jacobs 2014
Nussberg 2003
Lev Nussberg (Russian, born in Uzbekistan, 1937), Natalia Prokuratova (Russian, 1948). Altar for the Temple of the Spirit (Sketch for the creation of an altar at the Institute of Kinetics), 1969-70. Tempera and photocollage on paper. Gift of Dieter and Jutta Steiner. Collection Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union. Photo by Jack Abraham 2006

Further, Ksenia played and translated “I believe, friends!” by Vladimir Troshin (1962). In the video below he’s marching around Moscow, rousing listeners to exalt in the glory of the space race. Check it out:

Towards the end of the show Stevie spoke with the editors of the blog Highwire Earth, Julio Herrera Estrada (Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief, doctoral candidate in the Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Program) and Matt Grobis (Co-Founder and Managing Editor, doctoral candidate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology)**, which posts articles from Princeton researchers who’s work focuses on balancing human development and sustainability. From prison reform to sustainable land use, there’s a lot of interesting stuff already up on the site. We hope this will be only the beginning of an ongoing partnership between These Vibes and Highwire Earth.

**Two other founders and editorial staff members, Arvind Ravikumar (Co-Founder and Associate Editor) and Greta Shum (Co-Founder and Communications Director), were not in the studio due to space and availability.


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