About.

Hello there. We’re Stevie and Brian, graduate students in physics* at Princeton University and hosts of These Vibes are too Cosmic (TVR2C), a radio show on WPRB. Find us on your FM dial at 103.3 or online at wprb.com.

TVR2C is a mix of music and science. In one show we’ll play punk, new wave, soul, blues, latin, africa, instrumental rock, …, and some science! Be it science facts that we compiled over the week or interviews with local researchers at Princeton (and visitors).

On this site we’ll post as many shows as possible, for as long as Mixcloud lets us, as well as interviews. Sometimes I’ll add visuals, links, and descriptions to the interviews, to give you more to go on. And please take part! Please let us know any questions you have on a topic in the comments, or for a more real time response:

  • email us at tvr2c.wprb@gmail.com,
  • visit us on our Facebook page,
  • tweet at us @tvr2cwprb,
  • during showtimes call in and chat with us at 609-258-1033.

That’s it – enjoy.

 

*Brian’s technically in the Plasma Physics program, but we don’t hold it against him.
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5 thoughts on “About.

  1. Last week was a great show. The more you guys talk about science, the better. Have you ever thought about skipping the music, and discussing science for the whole show? Physics is the queen of the sciences and you guys have so much information to share. And you two do it well. Thanks again and I look forward to tomorrow night’s show.
    Tom

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    1. Thanks so much, Tom. And thanks for listening! We like keeping the music portion both because we’re a part of WPRB, which is all about music you don’t generally hear on the radio, and to give our listeners a bit of a break. If you’re not in to the music, check out our podcast. It’s the interviews without the music. Again, thanks for listening in! -Stevie

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  2. Brian,
    What are your thoughts on the ITER program in France? And do you think fusion type power plants will ever be practical?
    Thanks!
    Tom

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  3. Hi Tom!
    Somehow I missed your question until now. ITER is definitely at the center of many discussions on plasma physics, given how much the field is putting most of its eggs in one basket. In a perfect political reality there would be enough funding for ITER, other tokamaks, and the many smaller/cheaper alternative concepts that are out there… But in our world, it’s unfortunate that ITER has sapped funding away from many of these smaller projects. I am optimistic that ITER will work and produce great fusion results, but it’s not going to happen anytime soon (think 2030 for meaningful physics results, at least).

    I hope fusion will be practical! I think there are a lot of paths forward that perhaps would already be solved right now if funding had been improved. I think over decades the physics and engineering challenges are solvable, provided that money is available… Perhaps the private companies (Tri Alpha, General Fusion) will be able to circumvent a less hospitable federal budget with the help of their investors. At any rate, even if fusion is enormously successful and deployed worldwide by 2100, I’m doubtful it will be ready for the middle of this century when we may need it the most.

    Thanks for your questions!
    Brian

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